Database Seeding

Flush cache before seeding

You may discover that it is best to flush this package’s cache before seeding, to avoid cache conflict errors.

// reset cached roles and permissions
app()[\Spatie\Permission\PermissionRegistrar::class]->forgetCachedPermissions();

This can be done directly in a seeder class. Here is a sample seeder, which first clears the cache, creates permissions and then assigns permissions to roles (the order of these steps is intentional):

use Illuminate\Database\Seeder;
use Spatie\Permission\Models\Role;
use Spatie\Permission\Models\Permission;

class RolesAndPermissionsSeeder extends Seeder
{
    public function run()
    {
        // Reset cached roles and permissions
        app()[\Spatie\Permission\PermissionRegistrar::class]->forgetCachedPermissions();

        // create permissions
        Permission::create(['name' => 'edit articles']);
        Permission::create(['name' => 'delete articles']);
        Permission::create(['name' => 'publish articles']);
        Permission::create(['name' => 'unpublish articles']);

        // create roles and assign created permissions

        // this can be done as separate statements
        $role = Role::create(['name' => 'writer']);
        $role->givePermissionTo('edit articles');

        // or may be done by chaining
        $role = Role::create(['name' => 'moderator'])
            ->givePermissionTo(['publish articles', 'unpublish articles']);

        $role = Role::create(['name' => 'super-admin']);
        $role->givePermissionTo(Permission::all());
    }
}

Speeding up seeding for large data sets

When seeding large quantities of roles or permissions you may consider using Eloquent’s insert command instead of create, as this bypasses all the internal checks that this package does when calling create (including extra queries to verify existence, test guards, etc).

    $arrayOfPermissionNames = ['writer', 'editor'];
    $permissions = collect($arrayOfPermissionNames)->map(function ($permission) {
        return ['name' => $permission, 'guard_name' => 'web'];
    });

    Permission::insert($permissions->toArray());

Alternatively you could use DB::insert, as long as you also provide all the required data fields. One example of this is shown below … but note that this example hard-codes the table names and field names, thus does not respect any customizations you may have in your permissions config file.

$permissionsByRole = [
    'admin' => ['restore posts', 'force delete posts'],
    'editor' => ['create a post', 'update a post', 'delete a post'],
    'viewer' => ['view all posts', 'view a post']
];

$insertPermissions = fn ($role) => collect($permissionsByRole[$role])
    ->map(fn ($name) => DB::table()->insertGetId(['name' => $name]))
    ->toArray();

$permissionIdsByRole = [
    'admin' => $insertPermissions('admin'),
    'editor' => $insertPermissions('editor'),
    'viewer' => $insertPermissions('viewer')
];

foreach ($permissionIdsByRole as $role => $permissionIds) {
    $role = Role::whereName($role)->first();

    DB::table('role_has_permissions')
        ->insert(
            collect($permissionIds)->map(fn ($id) => [
                'role_id' => $role->id,
                'permission_id' => $id
            ])->toArray()
        );
}